Top Films set in Hong Kong

  

Long Arm Of The Law(1)

Hong Kong is a city like no other. It's the place where the most modern skyscrapers stand tall next to historic temples. It's the place where east meets west in an interesting clash of civilizations. These singularities about Hong Kong have also attracted filmmakers interested in capturing the city's spirit. Here are some of the most notable films set in Hong Kong:

Directed by Johnny Mak, Long Arm of the Law (1984) was a marvelous pre-cursor to the explosive crime thrillers of John Woo and Ringo Lam. Famous for its quote “We'll act in unison from now on. All for one, right?” the film follows Red Guards-turned-armed robbers through the sharp end of these Mainlanders' dreams of making a fortune in the more “modernised” Hong Kong. With memorable scenes ranging from a helicopter ambush to a gunpoint standoff, the film reaches its climax with a shootout inside the claustrophobic Kowloon Walled City.
Election 2 also tops the list with its famous quote “I can also make you a deal. I can also be a patriot.” Directed by Johnnie To, the film shows an intrinsic interest in the triad society's origins. The political satire shows the power struggles surrounding the biannual voting process at the top of “Hong Kong's oldest triad.” The film mocks simplistic capitalist ideals and democratic aspirations in the very same stroke.
The Private Eyes, directed by Michael Hui and released in 1979, impresses the audience at once with its wordless opening credit sequence showing only the characters' feet. The comedy is known for many quotes, including:
“Eating too much will cause hemorrhoids, don't you know? Name one person with hemorrhoids who doesn't eat.”
“I said when I died, that I'd come back. If you believe in ghosts, you're on the right track. I'm out of the grave, and roaming the moores. If you want to be safe, you better lock all the windows and screens.”
“In this house, it's hard to survive. Some'll be dead, who are now alive. Mr. Uwatsum is gone, ‘cause he knew too much. Bye for now, but rest assured we'll keep in constant contact with each other.”
“Sucked the brains clean out of a pig.”
“You know who you are? You're the two idiots what got your picture in the newspaper.
The characters include a cheeky boss ready to exploit his employees, a kung-fu fighting apprentice and a stupid assistant who will test a bomb for him, literally. The comedy includes Bruce-Lee inspired fight scene with flour and sausages.
The Arch is the first feature by Cecile Tang, one of the extremely few woman filmmakers then working in Hong Kong. This legendary film, released in 1969, is one of the most significant classics in film history despite its limited distribution. The film tells the story of Madam Tung, a dignified middled-aged widow soon to be honored by the emperor for her chastity. Meanwhile, she is tormented by her suppressed desire for a cavalry captain stayer at her aristocratic residence. The main character meets her misery when the captain turn his attention to her young daughter. A famous quote from this film is “We can't take the plums home.”

Paul Theroux, Kowloon Tong: A Novel of Hong Kong

  

kowloon tong

With an intoxicating cultural clash like no other, Hong Kong is a unique city and this special character about the city has seduced many notable writers who have attempted to convey this distinctive character. Taking into account its complex history and evolving present, these works of both fiction and non-fiction focus on Hong Kong and are a means to understanding this city in constant evolution. Kowloon Tong is a novel by Paul Theroux about Neville "Bunt" Mullard, an English mummy's boy born and raised in Hong Kong. The story is set in the days leading up to the handover to China of Hong Kong from the British.

One of the most outstanding authors that have attempted to capture the essence on this city in his writing is Paul Theroux. In fact, the novelist said that “When I went to Hong Kong, I knew at once I wanted to write a story set there.” His book Kowloon Tong: A Novel of Hong Kong, published in 1997, depicts the city on the cusp of the most dramatic event in its history, the 1997 handover to China. Today, the book remains a powerful exploration of the ambivalence felt by most citizens towards this epoch defining event. Ninety-nine years of colonial history are about to meet its end and the time has come for the east and west to finally meet.
The book tells the story of a family of English expats who have settled in Hong Kong and become entangled in a mysterious web of crime, deceit and betrayal due to their involvement with the shady Chinese businessman Mr Hung. The main character Neville ‘Bunt' Mullard is symbolic of the confusion of identities Hong Kong citizens inherit, and leads a double life as he winds his way through the crowded city. Theroux's novel captures the sense of anxiety and menace that encapsulated Hong Kong at the time, and the complex spectrum of economic, social and historical issues which the city faced before returning to Chinese control.
“Albion Cottage was off Lugard Road, on a bluff above the Peak fire station. The fire brigade was inside today with the windows and doors shut. Everything in the bungalow on a morning like this had a film of dampness and the dampness seemed to live in the mildew and gave the interior the ripe cheesy odor of a mortuary... Yet on a clear morning, like a hallucination from the east-facing windows, where heavy with blackflies and aphids there were nasturtiums tumbling from a window box, Betty could see China - red China, as they used to call it. Shum Chun was an hour by train from the factory in Kowloon Tong across the harbor.”
 
Paul Edward Theroux is an American travel writer and novelist, whose best known work is The Great Railway Bazaar (1975), a travelogue about a trip he made by train from Great Britain through Western and Eastern Europe, the Middle East, through South Asia, then South-East Asia, up through East Asia, as far east as Japan, and then back across Russia to his point of origin. Although perhaps best known as a travel writer, Theroux has also published numerous works of fiction, some of which were made into feature films. He was awarded the 1981 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his novel The Mosquito Coast.

Books set in Hong Kong

  

White Ghost Girls

From Paul Theroux to Jan Morris, famous authors from all walks of life have been fascinated by the vibrant city of Hong Kong and have chosen the island as the setting for their successful books. Here are the books that have best captured Hong Kong's in all its colorful and vibrant glory.

The first one to be mentioned is Jan Morris' book “Hong Kong” which was published back in 1997. The author explores Hong Kong's complex past, present and future in 1997, during the last days Hong Kong was under the British rule. In 1984, the British and Chinese governments signed the Sino-British Joint Declaration which stated that the sovereignty of Hong Kong should enjoy a “high degree of autonomy” under the “One Country, Two Systems” principle.
One of the famous passages of the book reads as follows:
“It is more than a city actually, being an archipelago of some 235 rocks and islands attendant upon a squat mountainous peninsula. Humped or supine, silent in the haze, to the south and west the islands seem to lie bewitched along the dim blue coast of China, and to the north a line of mainland hills stands like a rampart - the hills of Kowloon, or Nine Dragons. With luck the sea, when the mist disperses, will be a tremendous emerald green, and if one looks with a sufficiently selective eye it is easy enough to imagine the place as it was when it first entered world history, 150 years ago.”
Another honorable mention is Alice Greenway's White Ghost Girls, published in 2006. This is a powerful and haunting novel of love and loss that was long-listed for the Orange Prize. The book tells the story of Frankie and Kate, two American sisters living in a foreign land in a chaotic time.
“Out in the harbor, at the end of summer, fishermen feed the hungry ghosts. They float paper boats shaped like junks and steamships. One is double-prowed like the cross-harbor Star Ferry which plies its way back and forth between Hong Kong (island) and Kowloon, never having to turn around. The fishermen load each tiny paper boat with some tea leaves, a drop of cooking oil, a spoonful of rice, a splash of petrol, before setting it afloat. Boats for the lost at sea, for the drowned. They hire musicians to clang cymbals. Children throw burning spirit money into the waves.”
An engrossing and detailed historical novel is The Piano Teacher by Janice Y K Lee, published in 2009. The novel tells a love story set in Hong Kong in the 1940s and 1950s. A married woman is hired by a rich family to give piano lessons and ends up having a love affair with the driver who had a tragic love story of his own. The novel moves fluidly between one love story and the other. The character of Trudy was loosely based on American novelist and journalist Emily Hahn.
Here is an extract from the novel:
“To her surprise, she didn't detest Hong Kong, as her mother told her she would - she found the streets busy and distracting, so very different from Croydon, and filled with people and shops and goods she had never seen before. She liked to sample the local bakery goods, the pineapple buns, and yellow egg tarts, and sometimes wondered outside Central, where she would quickly find herself in unfamiliar surroundings, where she might be the only non-Chinese around. The fruit stalls were heaped with not only oranges and bananas, still luxuries in post-war England, but spiky, strange-looking fruits she came to try and like: starfruit, durian, lychee.”

 

Festivals in Hong Kong

  

Festivals in Hong Kong

Tradition meets modernity and the East blends with the West all year in Hong Kong throughout its festivals. From the officially supported Mega Events Fund and “M” Mark Events to ancient and quirky local festivals, there's something for everyone in this vibrant city.

Chinese New Year
Celebrations start with the Chinese New Year, Hong Kong's most celebrated festival. A frenzy of neon and noise, skyscrapers on both sides of the harbor are lit up while fireworks explode over the harbor. This event takes place three days from the first day of the first moon, usually late January or early February.
Spring Lantern (Yuen Siu)
Known as the Chinese Valentine's Day, Spring Lantern (Yuen Siu) Festival marks the end of the traditional Lunar New Year celebrations. The reason why Cupid makes his appearance on this festival is that the event is characterized by canoodling couples who take to the parks under the gentle glow of lanterns. This festival takes place on the 23rd of the 3rd moon (April).
Cheung Chau Bun Festival
Another remarkable event is the Cheung Chau Bun Festival. Young men used to climb up 8m (26ft) towers covered in buns. This practice, however, was banned in the 1970s as some men would fall off and injure themselves. The event was revived in a tamer form in 2005. The festival takes place on the 6th day of the 4th moon (May).
Ching Ming Festival
Also known as the grave-sweeping festival, ching ming means “clear and bright.” Chinese families visit the graves of their ancestors to clear them of any weeds and wilted flowers. It is a widespread practice to light incense and burn paper money. This event takes place on the first week of April.
Dragon Boat (Tuen Ng) Festival
During the Dragon Boat (Tuen Ng) Festival, drums thunder and paddles churn the waters of Hong Kong as garish craft vie for the top prize. The festival was founded to commemorate Qu Yuan, a 3rd-century poet-statesman who drowned himself to protest against corrupt rulers. The festival takes place on the 5th day of the 5th moon (early June) on various venues.
Hungry Ghost (Yue Laan) Festival
From the 14th day of the seventh moon, Chinese believe the gates of Hell are kicked open and the undead run free on Earth for a whole month. During that time, countless “Hell money” is burned on pyres along with various hillsides. Consequently, this is not a good time for hiking. The festival takes place across various locations in July.
Mid-Autumn Festival
This is an unmissable festival in Hong Kong as it is the most picturesque. Families flock to the country parks to burn candles and feast on yolk-centered moon-cakes. Modernity has also influenced this festival, as nowadays the intricate paper lanterns have increasingly been supplanted by glowing, blow-up Hello Kitty, Doraemon and Pokémon dolls. This event takes place on the 15th night of the 8th moon (August). A good spot to watch this festival is Victoria Park.
Chung Yeung Festival
This event requires hiking as it honors a Han Dynasty scholar who took his family up a hill and came back to find the rest of his village murdered. The event takes place on the 9th evening of the 9th moon (usually mid-to late October on any hilltop.

 

Pop culture and Hong Kong

  

maroon5

Hong Kong is a great city that has been mentioned in books by authors from different nationalities. Here are some of the books where Hong Kong features:

“The Mologai. The sun shines less in the Mologai, but heat gathers there in the shade and smoke. Steep cramped dwellings, shops oldish. Oddly, smoke pervading the whole area. The streets cling to contours. You clamber up steps from one narrow alleyway to the next, among the stalls. It's an antique hunter's paradise - or rather purgatory, because the promise of heaven takes time to realize.” Jonathan Gash, Jade Woman
“There were streets, narrow and crowded with people and vehicles. Above them flashed neon lights and blinking billboards of every colour, shape and size. Some ran up the sides of buildings, others blinked on and off in store windows. In the space above the sidewalk, higher than a double-decker bus, hung flashing neon signs in bright pink, yellow, read, blue, orange, green and white. Yes, if white could be whiter than white, it was when it was in neon, Hong Mei thought. She knew Nathan Road in Kowloon was famous for its neon lights.” B.L. Sauder, Year of the Golden Dragon
“It's not rocket science. Hong Kong has 95% tax compliance, because it's code is only 4 pages long with a 15% flat tax.” Ziad K. Abdelnour, Economic Warfare: Secrets of Wealth Creation in the Age of Welfare Politics
“This is Unique !! Shopping malls working with one side of our needs, material satisfaction but here @ K11 there is a huge effort and initiative to bring emotional needs of human, our spiritual satisfaction. K11 doing this with bringing Art and Nature in to the material shopping experience. It is not only satisfying physical needs and material but also our soul. Art itself is biggest teacher and Nature is biggest artist.” Baris Gencel
"For all its reputation for conservatism, cricket in its history has demonstrated a remarkable capacity for innovation. What game has survived subjection to such extraordinary manipulations, having been prolonged to 10 days (in Durban 70 years ago), truncated to as few as 60 balls (in Hong Kong every year), and remained recognisable in each instance?” Gideon Haigh

Quotes about Hong Kong

  

quotes about HK

With its breathtaking parks and a Chinese cultural influenced by years of British colonial rule, Hong Kong is a city full of surprises. Here are some quotes that honor this intriguing city.

“You can leave Hong Kong, but it will never leave you.” Nury Vittachi
“Life in Hong Kong transcends cultural and culinary borders, such that nothing is truly foreign and nothing doesn't belong.” Peter Jon Lindberg
“If you're too free, you're like the way Hong Kong is now. It's very chaotic.” Jackie Chan
“... a fine way to capture a piece of the magic of a unique city. The drama, the charm and the beauty of Hong Kong is all here - just as is its breathless energy.” Nury Vittachi
“Hong Kong is a wonderful, mixed-up town where you've got great food and adventure. First and foremost, it's a great place to experience China in a relatively accessible way.” Anthony Bourdain
“When I went to Hong Kong, I knew at once I wanted to write a story set there.” Paul Theroux
“Hong Kong has created one of the most successful societies on Earth.” Prince Charles
“Life in Hong Kong transcends cultural and culinary borders, such that nothing is truly foreign and nothing doesn't belong.” Peter Jon Lindberg
“Hong Kong is a wonderful, mixed-up town where you've got great food and adventure. First and foremost, it's a great place to experience China in a relatively accessible way.” Anthony Bourdain
“Hong Kong girls have a genius sense of style. I came back to the States thinking no one here has any individuality. Or cute enough socks.” Camilla Belle
“When I lived in Hong Kong, I felt that Hong Kong is my family.” Jet Li
“Give Hong Kong to an artist. He can use it. It can be poetised.” Baris Gencel
“Who said Hong Kong is too small? In size perhaps but not in its soul and personality. Every corner in this city giving you full of surprises, if not every hour but at least every day...” Baris Gencel
“An image began to form in her mind. There were streets, narrow and crowded with people and vehicles. Above them flashed neon lights and blinking billboards of every color, shape and size. Some ran up the sides of buildings, others blinked on and off in store windows. In the space above the sidewalk, higher than a double-decker bus, hung flashing neon signs in bright pink, yellow, red, blue, orange, green and white. Yes, if white could be whiter than white, it was when it was in neon, Hong Mey thought. She knew Nathan Road in Kowloon was famous for its neon lights. Were these streets of Kowloon that she was seeing it her head?” B.L. Sauder, Year of the Golden Dragon
“Americans think New Yorkers are property obsessed, but clearly they haven't lived a day in Hong Kong. In this part of the world, a man isn't a man until he is a homeowner. His entire life leads up to the singular moment when he hands over the down-payment check and puts his signature on the triplicate purchase agreement. All the good grades and job promotions he has received are mere preparation; and every source of happiness - marriage, children and retirement - depends on it.” Jason Y. Ng, No City for Slow Men: Hong Kong's quirks and quandaries laid bare

 

A traveler's guide to Hong Kong

  
Nan Lian Garden
Caught up between History and modernity, Hong Kong offers extreme contrasts to the eyes of avid travelers. While the city prides itself in its modern skyscrapers, Hong Kong also treasures its historical temples.
An unmissable attraction in Hong Kong is watching the sunset from Victoria Peak, the highest region on the island. In colonial times, the area was an exclusive neighborhood for the rich to come and escape the heat and smog of the city in a cooler temperate. Despite the invention of the air conditioner, nowadays the view keeps attracting both tourists and locals to this spot. People gather in the area to enjoy the last glimpse of the day before the sky is painted by an array of pinks and oranges.
A Grade 1 historical building and temple, Lo Pan Temple, can be found at the western end of Hong Kong Island. This is the only temple dedicated to the patron saint of Chinese builders and carpenters in Hong Kong. Although it is a square and mainly grey building surrounded by other plain properties, it is attractively decorated with gold Chinese symbols of poems praising Lo Pan's contribution to architecture above the entrance. On the outside, ornate red decoration on the roof makes the temple stand out; inside, murals bring the walls to life.
Right in the middle of the city, there's Nan Lian Park in Diamond Hill. Built in the classical style of Tang Dynasty, this oasis boasts traditional pagoda buildings overlooking large lakes, rocky waterfalls and landscaped gardens dotted with tree. The scenery creates a peaceful getaway from the madness of the city. Locals and tourists alike come here to relax while they listen to tricking water.
The Buddhist temple of Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin is brightly decorated on the outside with colorful symbols. Its name translate into ‘make every wish come true' which probably has something to do with its popularity, although it remains an important religious place. Although the temple was built to commemorate Wong Tai Sin - a famous monk from the 4th century, it's actually home to three religions: Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism. The influence of feng shui is also palpable in the design of the building, even in the colorful gardens.
After relaxing at the park and indulging your curiosity at the temples, it might be time for an adventure and Dragon's Back hike is just what you need. The hike is an incredible way to see great views with the advantage of fresh air. The trail resembles the shape of a dragon's back bone, hence the name, and it leads walkers through hill tops. Some of the great views you will spot are those of Shek O, Tai Long Wan, Stanely, Tai Tan and the South Chine Sea.

Bruce Lee

  

bruce lee(1)

Hong Kong and American actor, Bruce Lee was also a martial artist, philosopher, filmmaker and founder of the martial art Jeet Kune Do. A pop culture icon of the 20th century, Lee is widely considered by commentators, critics, media and other martial artists to be one of the most influential martial artists of all time. His influence was such that he is often credited with helping to change the way Asians were depicted in Hollywood.

Born in Chinatown, San Francisco, to parents from Hong Kong, Lee was raised in Kowloon with his family until his late teens. Although his mother was a Cantonese opera star - Lee Hoi-Chuen - it was his father who introduced him to the film industry and appeared in several films as a child actor.
His Hong Kong and Hollywood-produced films elevated the traditional Hong Kong martial arts film to a new level of popularity and acclaim, causing a surge of interest in Chinese martial arts in the West in the 1970s. The direction and tone of his films changed and influenced martial arts and martial arts films in the US, Hong Kong and the rest of the world.
He is noted for the films The Big Boss, Fist of Fury, Way of the Dragon, Enter the Dragon and The Game of Death. His portrayal of Chinese nationalism in his films won him worldwide popularity, particularly among the Chinese.
Here are some of his most famous quotes:
  • “Mistakes are always forgivable, if one has the courage to admit them.”
  • “I'm not in this world to live up to your expectations and you're not in this world to live up to mine.”
  • “If you spend too much time thinking about a thing, you'll never get it done.”
  • “I fear not the man who has practice 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.”
  • “A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer.”
  • “Always be yourself, express yourself, have faith in yourself, do not go out and look for a successful personality and duplicate it.”
  • “Adapt what is useful, reject what is useless, and ad what is specifically your own.”
  • “To hell with circumstances; I create opportunities.”
  • “Knowing is not enough, we must apply. Willing is not enough, we must do.”
  • “If you love life, don't waste time, for time is what life is made up of.”
  • “A goal is not always meant to be reached, it often serves simply as something to aim at.”
  • “Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.”
  • “Mistakes are always forgivable, if one has the courage to admit them.”
  • “Defeat is a state of mind; no one is ever defeated until defeat has been accepted as a reality.”
  • “For it is easy to criticize and break down the spirit of others, but to know yourself takes a lifetime.”
  • “Always be yourself, express yourself, have faith in yourself, do not go out and look for a successful personality and duplicate it.”
  • “The past is no more; the future not yet. Nothing exists except the here and now. Our grand business is not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at our hands.”

Where to eat in Hong Kong

  

Dim Sum

From dim sum to shark fin soup, dishes in Hong Kong suit every palate. You are equally likely to find the most delectable food either at a high-end restaurant or at a street stall.

Hong Kong's most popular food is, naturally, Cantonese, consisting of fast cooking at very high temperatures with abundant tiny chopped vegetables and, of course, seafood.
The well-known dim sum snack is a steamed dough dumpling looking snack filled with meat or vegetables. The best delicacy, however, is shark's fin soup, which also happens to be one of the most expensive meals.
From local foods to world cuisine, there are an overwhelming eateries in the buzzing area of Hong Island. If you are looking for Hong Kong style food, Faj Seafood Hotpot is the place to eat at. Like its name indicates, the place also serves hot pots and, naturally, Chinese food. Its signature dishes include steamed crabs and hot and spicy Szechuan Broth. The beef is also recommended here. If you prefer to have a European meal at a luxurious environment, opt for Amber, a French restaurant in Central.
Although the former industrial neighborhood of Kowloon is renown for its international cuisine, it specializes in Asian foods such as Indian and Cantonese. Most of Kowloon's eateries are welcoming, economical and family-run. If you are looking to try an authentic curry, head to Bombay Dreams which seres southern and northern Indian dishes. If you'd rather try a local dish, the floating restaurant of Jumbo Kingdom serves delectable Cantonese dishes, particularly seafood such as shark fin and lobster soup. You can find them on Open rice.
While Kowloon boasts international dishes, the restaurants in the islands of the New Territories tend to stick to local cuisine, making them an ideal place to eat the local and traditional delicacies that are often served in lovely wooden shacks. Head to Tai Wing Wah for real traditional recipes, including dim sum and steamed shredded taro with pork.
Lantau Island - one of Hong Kong's largest islands - offers a variety of attractions, ranging from grand vistas, amusement parks to quiet beaches and historic villages. Although the island is not able to compete with mega-metropolis Hong Kong when it comes to good, Lantau offers quite a few good dining venues that suit most people's budget. From the cheap eateries to the more high-end restaurants at Discovery Bay, there's a good range to choose from. Although the island does not offer as many options as the mainland does, visitors can enjoy countless types of cuisine, ranging from Cantonese to other regional Chinese dishes to Italian, Turkish, Mediterranean, South African and English. For a casual bite such as sushi and tempura, Kiraku Tei is the place to go. Wash down the scrumptious bites with Japanese sake and beer. Hang out at the Stoep which is right on the beach for Mediterranean food. Indulge yourself in mixed grills and ostrich steak with great views and a family friendly atmosphere.
If you want to dine in style, head to Victoria Harbour, spectacularly lit up at night by the Symphony of Light Show. Known for its upmarket hotels and restaurants that are inside of them, the area is a great place to dine with amazing views over the natural harbor. The Peninsular Hotel does a fantastic afternoon tea in the Lobby in a colonial style with quaint sandwiches and charming cakes.

Moomin Cafe: Anti-loneliness restaurant in HK

  

moomins go to hk

Solo diners have a place to dine in Hong Kong now that Japan's Moomin cafe opened in the Chinese region. Instead of sharing a meal with other fellow humans, your companion in this cafe are stuffed animals.The stuffed dining companions are there to sit next to solo travelers and help banish their loneliness.

Set in one of Hong Kong's busiest malls, the Moomin cafe is made to look like a Finnish house and garden and it features Nordic cuisine, including traditional dishes such as venison stew, salmon milk soup and piirakka.
Hong Kong's new eatery is the first overseas venture for a concept that has already proved a hit in Japan.
The franchise is inspired by popular Finnish stories that tell the adventures of a family of white hippo-like characters and their friends. Although the Moomins was first published in Finland back in 1945, it didn't receive global attention until the release of its television series in the 1990s.
The first Moomin Cafe opened in Tokyo in 2003. Since then, three more have opened and six Moomin-themed coffee stands. The timing of the opening of the Hong Kong Moomin Cafe couldn't be better, it coincides with the 100th anniversary of the birth of Moomin creator, Tove Jansson.
Although Japan's original Moomin Cafe has been operating for over a decade, its popularity only exploded earlier this year after its “anti-loneliness” concept went viral.
To save its customers from the loneliness of solo dining, a plush Moomin character is brought over to the table as dining companion. “I thought if people can stay and sit with Moomin characters like Moominmamma and Moominpappa (parents in the Moomin family), it'd be more interesting,” says Mickey Kera, who was the one who came up with the cafe concept.
However, Hong Kong's single diners may have to struggle to find an adorable meal buddy. “Unlike Japan's anti-loneliness cafes, Moomin characters will be placed at various tables and joining a Moomin character will be up to luck,” says cafe spokeswoman Cindy Wu.
Wu also said that the Hong Kong location features three additional characters not found in the Japanese outlets: Hattifatteners, Little My and Snufkin.
Moomin Cafe may have originated in Japan, but the outlet tries to reflect Finnish lifestyle and cuisine. The Tsim Tsa Tsui venue is designed to look like a traditional Finnish house, with photographs of Finland and hand drawn artwork of Moomins.
“I love the venison soup stew, salmon milk soup and Jansson's temptation (baked potato with caramelized onion gratin), which are traditional Nordic dishes,” says Kera.
“I really want to introduce Moomin and Finnish lifestyle to Hong Kong people.” The cafe also offers Finnish traditional bread - Piirakka - and Scandinavian salad with pickled herring, as well as a Nordic dish of salmon with goat cheese and basil.
The new cafe in Hong Kong also features certain dishes that are not available in Japan. For instance, the Moomin House Pancakes are exclusive to the Hong Kong location. This dish consists of an impressive stack drizzled with cream and accompanied by a three-story ceramic Moomin house containing custard pudding, chocolate mousse and mango jelly.
For those diners who wish to take some of the Moomin house home, they can order the Souvenir Mango Cup Pudding so they can take the mug used to serve the dessert. Moomin-shaped past is also available at the souvenir store.
  
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